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2021

  • April

    A New Day for Financial Aid

    Journal of College Admissions

    Change is on the horizon as the FAFSA shrinks and colleges seek to simplify award letters.

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  • Addressing Stress in the College Search and Application Process

    Journal of College Admissions 

    After a year that has tried us all in ways we never imagined, many of our teens are lonely, stressed, and confused. As the adults in their lives, we hope to offer them the tools and insights that might ease the burdens they face, including the uncertainties and challenges of applying to college amid the pandemic. 

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  • Fear of Flying: Counseling Families Through the Process

    Journal of College Admissions


    Parents and guardians often have more fear than their students about the journey off to college. They are unsure about fit, cost and value, distance, health and safety, an empty nest, and more. 

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  • College Decisions: Investing, Game Shows, And Mascots

    Forbes

    How do you make big decisions? Are you methodical, using a specific formula for how you approach your choice? Or are you a “go with your gut” decider, who taps into an emotional response to your options? Perhaps you fall somewhere in the middle? Major decisions can be daunting, especially for many young people who have not faced significant life choices. With little practice, some students arrive at the opportunity to choose a college and are stopped in their tracks. By May 1, the National Candidate Reply Date, newly admitted students must decide where they will enroll and some are still stuck between two (or more) options that seem equally appealing. What now?

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  • A New Roadmap to College Admissions: What's Important?

    Ed Hat

    In my last article, I wrote about the changes to the college admissions process due to COVID-19 including the optional college entrance exams (SAT or ACT), acceptance of pass/fail grading, little or no extracurricular activities to list on your application, limited or no Advanced Placement (AP) exam scores, no admissions tours to familiarize yourself with the admissions staff and college, and no school or youth sports used to strengthen your application. Both college admission staff and prospective college applicants are learning how to navigate this unchartered journey of college admissions without reliance on a decade-old recipe.

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  • More Students Applied to Top Colleges This Year. How Making Test Scores Optional Opened the Field.

    Washington Post

    Akosa Obianwu dreams of studying public health, and he has admission offers in hand from Johns Hopkins University and several other competitive schools. Now this 18-year-old high school senior from Maryland is waiting to hear in the next few days from the Ivy League.

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  • Pandemic Year Amps Up College Acceptance Worries

    Boston Herald

    Many high school seniors looking to attend the most competitive U.S. colleges are about to have their hearts broken after an already difficult year.

    Students on average applied to 9% more colleges as of March 1 compared with last year, according to data from the Common Application, a nonprofit that lets individuals apply to multiple schools.

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  • March

    College Admissions Officers on How the Pandemic Has Changed the Process

    Today Show

    The pandemic has impacted the college admissions process in many ways, including the elimination of standardized test requirements and students’ ability to visit schools. With all of these changes, college admissions officers speak to NBC’s Kate Snow about how their respective processes for recruiting and accepting students have changed.

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  • Understanding Financial Aid Award Letters

    NACAC

    So you—or your child—got accepted to college. Congratulations! But now the financial aid award letter arrives. What does it mean? How much aid are you really receiving? What if it’s not enough? Will you have to pay it all back? This discussion aims to clear up some of the many mysteries about financial aid letters.

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  • January

    High School Grades Could Be Worth $100,000. Time to Tell Your Child?

    New York Times

    Most colleges and universities now use a "merit" aid strategy to solicit teenagers. Your eighth grader probably ought to know how it works.

    Financial aid is no longer just about what you earn and what you have. It’s also about your children and what they do — and that means that good grades can be worth a whole lot of money.

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College Connections is published four times a year—October, December, February and April
Back 2021

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