This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing to use this website, you consent to our use of these cookies.
A Jesuit College Preparatory Experience
Student Life
Campus Ministry

Solidarity Project

Solidarity Project 2019: Capturing the Power of Technology

Mission Statement

The ultimate goal of a Jesuit education is the full growth of the person which leads to independent action. Contributing to this formation, the Solidarity Project observes a certain theme through the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm (IPP). Understanding the context of the theme and engaging in real experiences of the marginalized and those working for change, the students, faculty, and administration reflect on how their faith calls them to action. Closing evaluations of the week will further inform the next year’s theme and activities. Students will recognize that their abilities, code of ethics, and everyday decisions impact the lives of others. As a result, they will recognize the humanity and dignity of the other, themselves, and of Jesus Christ, and begin to understand their social responsibility of ensuring the well-being of all. This awareness will result in an articulation of and a movement toward the Christian actions of companionship, advocacy, and stewardship.

Additional Information

List of 3 items.

  • 2019 Theme

    This year’s theme is Capturing the Power of Technology, exploring the potential of technology and its many positive and negative implications in today’s society. We will observe issues of injustice through the lens of technology, including gender inequality, education, bioethics, anthropogenic climate change, and public policy/social activism.

    Technology is the practical application of knowledge, a manner of accomplishing a task, especially using technical processes, methods or knowledge. In the context of justice work, technology “enables us to exercise dominion over matter, to reduce risks, to save labor, to improve our conditions of life” (CIV 69). From the discovery of penicillin to the development of the internet, this practical application of knowledge has engineered great innovations for the common good. The sheer power of technology appears ultimately limitless.

    That said, technology is rendered useless in the absence of human context. In other words, technology alone cannot create social change. Over the past half-century, Americans have witnessed an explosion of technological innovation, yet the poverty rate in the U.S. remains stagnant around mid-1960’s levels (Chaudry et al., 2016). “Without improvements in our collective intention, discernment and self-control - without better heart, mind, and will - we won’t use the fruits of our innovations to best effect,” (Toyama, 2015).

    Tying the theme to the overall mission of Solidarity Project, we recognize the potential of technology as a means of improving wellbeing while understanding that technology alone is not the answer to injustice. In terms of technological development, Pope Benedict XVI clarifies that technologies “need to focus on promoting the dignity of persons and peoples, they need to be clearly inspired by charity and placed at the service of truth, of the good, and of natural and supernatural fraternity” (CIV 73). Marrying the power of technology to the human synergy required for development, we seek to work in communion with each other in the search for justice.
  • The Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm (IPP)

    1. Context: How do we interact with technology and how does technology shape our culture? What are we capable of through technology?
    2. Experience: How are others using technology as a faith-informed response to the realities and injustices of the world? How does innovative technology support well-intentioned community development?
    3. Reflection: What can we learn from the experiences of both the marginalized and those working with the marginalized?
    4. Action: How can we adequately respond to injustices through the application of knowledge?
    5. Evaluation: What did we learn from the action(s) taken? How does this inform us for the future?
  • Bibliography

    "Caritas in Veritate (June 29, 2009) | BENEDICT XVI." Biography | Francis. http://w2.vatican.va/content/benedict-xvi/en/encyclicals/documents/hf_ben-xvi_enc_20090629_caritas-in-veritate.html.

    Chaudry, Ajay, Christopher Wimer, Suzanne Macartney, Lauren Frohlich, Colin Campbell, Kendall Swenson, Don Oellerich, and Susan Hauan. 2016. Poverty in the United States: 50-Year Trends and Safety Net Impacts. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

    Toyama, Kentaro. "How the Human Condition Limits the Power of Technology." The Seattle Times. June 11, 2015. https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/how-the-human-condition-limits-the-power-of-technology/.

For more information, please contact

List of 1 members.

  • Mr. Christopher Knoth 

    Campus Minister
    (847) 920-2537

Workshop Day

Loyola Academy’s annual Solidarity Project runs April 1-17, 2019. The Project will open with the Workshop Day on April 1 and concludes during Holy Week. The school will host a variety of activities and events throughout the 12 school days of Solidarity Project; the most comprehensive is the all-school, all-day Workshop Day. This guide briefly outlines the methodology behind the Solidarity Project before focusing on expectations and suggestions for our invited workshop speakers.

Workshop Day Schedule

List of 14 items.

  • Classroom Introduction

    7:45 to 8:30 a.m.
  • Transition to Gym

    8:30 to 8:45 a.m.
  • Keynote Speaker: Rev. Eric Sundrup, SJ

    8:45 to 9:35 a.m.
  • Transition

    9:35 to 9:55 a.m.
  • Workshop 1

    9:55 to 10:45 a.m.
  • Transition

    10:45 to 10:55 a.m.
  • Workshop 2

    10:55 to 11:45 a.m.
  • Transition

    11:45 to 11:55 a.m.
  • Workshop 3

    11:55 to 12:45 p.m.
  • Transition

    12:45 to 12:55 p.m.
  • Workshop 4/ISL Workshops

    12:55 to 1:45 p.m.
  • Examen

    1:45 to 1:50 p.m.
  • Transition

    1:50 to 2:05 p.m.
  • Keynote Speaker: Julia Garcia

    2:05 to 2:45 p.m.

List of 3 items.

  • Workshop Day Mission Statement

    The ultimate goal of a Jesuit education is the full growth of the person which leads to independent action. Contributing to this formation, the Solidarity Project observes a certain theme through the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm (IPP). Understanding the context of the theme and engaging in real experiences of the marginalized and those working for change, the students, faculty, and administration reflect on how their faith calls them to action. Closing evaluations of the week will further inform the next year’s theme and activities.

    Students will recognize that their abilities, code of ethics, and everyday decisions impact the lives of others. As a result, they will recognize the humanity and dignity of others, themselves, and of Jesus Christ, and begin to understand their social responsibility of ensuring the well-being of all. This awareness will result in an articulation of and a movement toward the Christian actions of companionship, advocacy, and stewardship.
  • Context

    This year’s theme is Capturing the Power of Technology, looking at the many implications technology has in today’s society - both positive and negative. We will observe issues of injustice through the lens of technology, including gender inequality, educational disparity, anthropogenic climate change, public policy/social activism, and more.
  • Structure of Day

    The Workshop Day on April 1, 2019, will start with an introduction to the day in the classrooms for all student participants. All students will then proceed to the West Gym for a keynote presentation by Fr. Eric Sundrup, S.J of America Media. There will then be four, 50-minute sessions of workshops throughout the school. The day will conclude with a keynote presentation by Julia Garcia of The Rewrite Project. Prior to the day, students will select which workshops they wish to attend based off of the title and description of the workshop, as provided by the speaker. Each student will attend 3 sessions, with the fourth session being their lunch period for the day.

Keynote Speakers

List of 2 items.

View the presentations offered

Workshop Day Sessions

List of 43 items.

  • Africa Clean Stoves

    Students will learn about problems related to climate change and indoor air pollution in developing countries. Students will learn about an innovative solution to this problem and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this solution and explore other alternatives as well.

    Speaker: Joe Dahm
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 221
  • Amplifying the Voice of the Immigrant: Teaching & Learning from Adult Migrants

    A fast-paced experience, this workshop is jam-packed with student-led presentations. Learn from upperclassmen ISL students and understand how you can be in better solidarity with those on the margins with something as simple as an iMovie.

    Speakers: Ignatian Service Learning students
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room: 50
  • Are you a victim of your own devices? Let's talk technology

    In this workshop, we will discuss the evolving risks that students face with the increased dependence on technology and social media. The conversation will not only focus on cyber crime, but the impact of social media on our day-to-day lives, including bullying. Students are encouraged to participate in the conversation to share their real life experiences and insight.

    Speaker: Michael J. Weber
    Organization: Dinsmore & Shohl LLP

    Room 43
  • Black Tech Unplugged

    Black Tech Unplugged was created to tell the stories of Blacks in Tech. These stories are created to help YOU, the listener, hear what others have went through to get where they are. To share resources and advice so you have guidance on your tech journey. Consider this a podcast, FOR the people. To help YOU put your FOOTPRINTS in tech.

    Speaker: Deena McKay
    Organization: Black Tech Unplugged Podcast

    Room 161
  • Braille as iPhone

    For millennia, people who were blind had almost no technology. With the creation of braille an entirely new world was made available, not unlike how the internet made information and communication has done. Learn how the initial disruptive technology of braille as a system of writing and reading developed and now has largely been replaced by other adaptive technologies and devices for the blind. Discuss how such cutting-edge technologies impact both the primary users and their communities.

    Speaker: Alexander Brown
    Organization: Friedman Place - A Community for Adults who are Blind or Visually Impaired

    Room 109
  • Building Communication Skills Through Improvisation

    In today's uber-technology-driven age, this workshop will use fundamental group exercises in the theater form of improvisation to provide participants a different --and fun-- perspective with regard to interpersonal/communication skills. So much of our time today is spent communicating via devices and social media. Not enough or our time is spent participating in, and honing, our verbal and non-verbal communication skills directly with one another, either in one-on-one or in group exchanges.

    Speaker: Bob Morand
    Organization: Former Improv Actor

    Room 151
  • Can Robots Save Manufacturing Workers?

    Since the 1970s, the number of manufacturing jobs in the United States has declined significantly, fueled by policy changes and the outsourcing of labor to lower-wage countries. Headlines warn that robots will "steal" the remaining jobs domestically. Should we fight against automation of menial tasks, or equip workers with the skills they need to work alongside robots? We'll review the history and consider how technology can equip U.S. manufacturing workers for the future.

    Speaker: Alyssa Sullivan
    Organization: MxD

    Room 244
  • Creating Change

    In this work shop we will discuss the methodology being used by the BASE Chicago to help change the narrative and trajectory of young lives on the westside of Chicago. A community that has been plagued with issues of generational poverty, generational unemployment and generational violence.

    Speaker: Eric Davis
    Organization: The BASE Chicago

    Room 251
  • DNA Technology and Their Application in Medicine

    In this workshop, we will discuss an overview of the technologies used in developing molecular diagnostic tests and how they are being used to identify, treat and prevent a variety of medical conditions. In addition, we will explore some of the critical ethical issues that are arising as these new technologies are developed.

    Speaker: Pat Groody
    Organization: Abbott Molecular

    Room 212
  • Doing Justice in Place

    In this workshop, we will experientially explore the interaction of two different ways of thinking about what we know and how we know it, and consider their implications for building a more specific and realistic personal agenda for doing justice. Place-based (or embedded) knowing takes seriously the questions and imperatives raised by WHERE we find ourselves, and dialogic knowing takes seriously the voices of those with WHOM we find ourselves.

    Speaker: Chris Skrable
    Organization: University of Chicago

    Room 100A
  • Electronic Evidence K9 Browser and Solving Cyber Crimes

    You will meet Electronic Evidence K9, Browser, a two year old black lab who is fighting Cyber Crime with his nose. Browser can "sniff out" digital evidence such as cell phones, flash drives and computers. You will see a demonstration, and learn about some Browser's cases. Learn what it takes to become a Cyber Crimes Forensic Analyst and how to investigate Cyber Crimes with today's technologies and tools, including some of the cases and how they were investigated.

    Speakers: Carol Gudbrandsen / Electronic Evidence K9 / Browser
    Organization: Lake Country State's Attorney's Office

    Room 238
  • Enabled by Technology

    Brad will join us via Skype to share his experience with Cerebral Palsy. Students will see first hand how the disorder affects various aspects of daily life and ways in which technology can improve the lives of those with the disorder.

    Speakers: Brad Smith / Paul Leon
    Organization: L'Arche

    Room 108
  • Environmental Sciences Capstone Projects: Environmentalism at Loyola

    This is a three-part workshop, including a poster conference, documentary viewing, and hands-on experiences, all created by the Capstone Projects of ISL science students.

    Speakers: Honors Environmental Sciences students
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 201
  • Everything Is Not Awesome

    Facebook set out to "make the world more open and connected." But now society often feels more closed and divided than ever. Facebook isn't the only technology platform struggling with our polarized world. Do we need to change our algorithms? Our attitudes? Or both? In this workshop, we'll look at recent data on media usage and talk about the breakdown of trust in our society. Since the discussion is lead by a Jesuit, you can expect to hear a little advice from your school's patron saint. Speaker: Fr. Eric Sundrup, SJ Organization: America Media Room: Chapel
  • Exploring and Balancing the Use of Technology

    In this workshop, we will discuss personal technology use at school and at home. Using the Mentimeter app, we will provide opportunities for feedback and view real-time data results to explore our technology habits while living and learning in a digital world. Attendees will be introduced to self-monitoring tools, including Apple Screen Time, to help us better understand positive, healthy technology interactions, and overall balanced use of technology. An iPad is required for this session.

    Speaker(s): David Behof / Jan Stoner
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room: 37
  • Fighting Fake News: How to Outsmart Trolls and Troublemakers

    Can you navigate the flurry of fake news and strike a balance between being a cynic and a sucker? Get the tools you need to stay ahead of online tricksters and trolls.

    Speaker: Adam Lewandowski
    Organization: Newseum

    Room 107
  • Folded Map Project

    Englewood photographer and activist Tonika Johnson invites students to think about the qualities of the spaces where they live, how to embark on a new neighborhood mission and learn about her Folded Map project.

    Speaker: Tonika Johnson
    Organization: Visual artist/photographer

    Room 261
  • Games for Social Impact

    In this workshop, students will play games focused on social impact created at the University of Chicago. Students will get a brief introduction to game design, system thinking, and career paths of a game designer. Speaker: Ashlyn Sparrow Organization: The University of Chicago's Game Changer Chicago Design Lab Room 128
  • Hands-on protein biochemistry: practical applications of basic research

    Perform a fluorescent protein purification that requires minimal equipment: pipettes, a hot water bath, and a plastic centrifuge, while also learning about protein basics and the role of protein purification in biotechnology, consumer products, and scientific inquiry.

    Speakers: Samantha Keyport / Dr. Jared Bard
    Organization: University of Chicago

    Room 243
  • Holocaust Survivor Stories Preserved through Technology

    Interact with a 2D beta model of the hologram technology used in the museum, discussing the importance and effectiveness of preserving survivor stories through technology

    Speaker: Amanda Friedman

    Organization: Harvey L. Miller Family Youth Educator at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center

    Room 42
  • Illinois Solar for all & Energy Efficiency Workshop

    In this workshop we will discuss Illinois Solar for All program and growing opportunities for green jobs in Illinois. We will also talk about the smart grid and practical steps people can take to become more energy efficient.

    Speaker: Thomas Gonzalez
    Organization: Elevate Energy

    Room 232
  • iNaturalist app, using tech for science and enjoyment

    We will use the iNaturalist app to collect observations of nature and harness the power of crowd sourcing to learn about nature.

    Speaker: Jenny Snyder
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 209
  • Instagrumpiness: No One is Listening and Everyone’s Offended

    In this workshop, we will explore the biology of anger and anxiety—challenging what we know and think about ourselves and our perceptions. Through an interactive discussion and open forum, we will dive into how social media’s purpose evolved over time and some key features that humanity wasn’t quite ready for. (Spoiler - it’s all Twitter’s fault).

    Speaker: Hannah Deason
    Organizations: Caxy Interactive and GrownGirl

    Room 256
  • Jumpstart in the Community: Support for Syrian Refugee Families

    In this workshop, we will use information and personal stories/story telling to explore the ways in which we can combat misconceptions of Syrian refugee youth, and how we can relate to one another, no matter the previous circumstances we may have faced. Using the information and stories they hear, I will encourage students to show they can relate to students their age (Syrian refugees) and how they can be part of a shared community expanding inclusivity and networks.

    Speaker: Leena Zahra
    Organization: Karam Foundation Community Program Coordinator

    Room 111
  • Marketing through Media

    In this workshop we will discuss the importance of a strong social media platform and the use of social media such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vimeo, etc for marketing, branding and fundraising. A short documentary film will be shoen

    Speaker: Lisa Faremouth Weber
    Organization(s): Documentary Film maker, owner Heaven Meets Earth Life Center

    Room: 34
  • Martha's Village Solidarity project

    In this workshop student's will share their ideas to help benefit homeless people in a Chicago homeless shelter. The students will share their ideas for urban gardening, aquaponics, and indoor shrimp production. Participants will vote on best idea and Margaret's Village will receive $500 award to hopefully pursue the project.

    Speaker: Joe Dahm
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 221
  • Media Ethics for Students

    Is it OK to clean up a quote or broadcast unconfirmed information? Students become more critical consumers of news media by examining real-life case studies of journalists striving to be accurate, fair and clear.

    Speaker: Talissa Proctor
    Organization: Newseum

    Room 108
  • Navigating the News

    The objective of this workshop is to put students on the path to becoming more responsible and effective consumers of news. Students at Loyola are taught how to find and evaluate information for academic research, but assessing authority, currency and objectivity in today's news environment can be less straightforward. Through discussion and hands-on activities, students will learn about bias in the news media, and how to deconstruct stories to determine what is news -- and what isn't.

    Speakers: Margo Stack / Amanda Pagnotta
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 102
  • Nonprofit Videos: Inspiring or Harmful?

    In this workshop, we will take a closer look at how nonprofit organizations utilize media to convey messages about their mission and influence our ability to respect the dignity of others. After viewing and discussing both positive and negative examples, we will identify how nonprofits and individuals alike can take action. This session will also include Molly MacCready sharing her personal journey of starting a nonprofit organization in her early 20s and the challenges she has faced.

    Speaker: Molly MacCready
    Organization: CROSO (Child Restoration Outreach Support Organization)

    Room 104
  • Pornography's Mistreatment of the Entire Person

    We'll explore the impact of on-line pornography on both consenting and non-consenting participants, producers, "actors" (those used to make it), consumers, their partners, relationships, and other victims. We''ll look at societal patterns and interesting individual cases, some that hit close to home, discussing what each of us can do today to protect ourselves and assist others. Speaker: Beverly Nikolaus Organization: Synergy Foundation, Fly the Plane Room: Marillac
  • Radical Kinship with the Homeless: Allowing the Sheltered to Open Our Eyes

    A fast-paced experience, this workshop is jam-packed with student-led presentations. Learn from upperclassmen ISL students and understand how you can be in better solidarity with those on the margins with something as simple as an iMovie.

    Speakers: Ignatian Service Learning students
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 50
  • Reel Advocacy: The ISL Film Festival

    The top documentaries produced for the ISL Capstone Projects will compete for a cash prize to be donated to their service site. The audience will vote on the best film. There will also be a student panel to present each documentary.

    Speakers: Ignatian Service Learning students
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room: Theater
  • Replacing Coal for Renewables

    Class project on Waukegan coal plant and the viability of replacing it with renewable energy

    Speakers: Ella Smyth '20 / Joe Walker '20
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 212
  • Reviews for Change

    In this workshop, we demonstrate how people with disabilities can use technology to self-advocate and bring about social change by posting reviews of businesses and organizations in their communities.

    Speaker(s): Tricia Luzadder / Sarah Armour
    Organization: Search, Inc.

    Room 40
  • Starting a Business from Scratch

    In this workshop, we will select a business idea, and start building it as if it were day one. We will consider incorporating, hiring, developing, marketing, and partnership outreach. As we make business decisions, we will incorporate the information into a fundraising pitch deck. We will expand our understanding of what it means to build a business and use what we learn to assist our own future business development.

    Speaker: John Detjen
    Organizations: FinleyKnight, Inc., Thinkboks LLC, NorthShore Codes LLC

    Room 257
  • Stories of Hope & Laughter: Working with Immigrant & Refugee Children

    A fast-paced experience, this workshop is jam-packed with student-led presentations. Learn from upperclassmen ISL students and understand how you can be in better solidarity with those on the margins with something as simple as an iMovie.

    Speakers: Ignatian Service Learning students
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room: 50
  • Stories of Wisdom & Strength: Learning from the Elderly & Disabled

    A fast-paced experience, this workshop is jam-packed with student-led presentations. Learn from upperclassmen ISL students and understand how you can be in better solidarity with those on the margins with something as simple as an iMovie.

    Speakers: Ignatian Service Learning Students
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 50
  • Technology and Criminal Investigations

    In this workshop, I will demonstrate how technology has impacted the course of criminal investigations. I will utilized 24 years of personal experience in criminal investigations, both as an detective and a supervisor to explore how technology has expanded the scope of law enforcement investigations.

    Speaker: Mia Ogliore
    Organization: Chicago Police Department, Violent Crimes

    Room 260
  • The Future of Communities: A Built Environment for a Better Environment

    In this workshop, a presentation on technology and uses of data will be a starting point for a discussion on building cities that are designed for a more sustainable future. We'll talk about technology resources we use in the built environment that can reduce energy, water, and material waste as well as trends that influence urban planning.

    Speaker: Juanita Garcia
    Organizations: BIM for Better, Environmentalists of Color, Shade of Green Chicago

    Room 157
  • The Promises and Pitfalls of Tech for Social Good

    Tech enthusiasts often want to use their technical skills to improve the world around them. Activists and local governments often turn to tech to simplify or amplify their missions. When done right, the results can empower our communities to work better for everyone. When done wrong, they can increase inequality and waste precious resources. In this talk and Q&A, we'll explore the huge potential of technology to make a better world, as well as the real-life dangers of ineffective civic tech.

    Speaker: Soren Spicknall
    Organization: Ask Whai

    Room 224
  • To boldly go where no woman has gone before...

    The workshop will focus on the important female figures in technology with a coding demonstration. I will begin the workshop by sharing one woman’s personal journey into the world of technology. After viewing a presentation of women who were "hidden figures" who made a significant impact in the field of technology we will explore programming.

    Speaker: Anita Debarlaben
    Organization: Loyola Academy

    Room 259
  • TV Production

    We will explore what goes into TV production, the ethics of what to air, and put together a short video.

    Speaker: Judy Nugent
    Organization: Outdoor Wisconsin

    Room 155
  • Your Health or Mine?

    In this workshop, we will confront global inequalities in health research and the biotech world. We will see the role that tech has played, both positive and negative, in responding to global health issues, and we will talk about how we can improve that response.

    Speaker: David Behof / Jan Stoner
    Organization(s): Loyola Academy

    Room 37

Our Mission

To form women and men for meaningful lives of leadership and service in imitation of Jesus Christ through a college preparatory education in the Jesuit, Catholic tradition.
Loyola Academy admits students of any race, color and national origin or ethnic origin.