A Jesuit College Preparatory Experience
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Community Education
Women of Wisdom Lecture Series

Entrepreneurship is My Soul: How It Can Cure Poverty

Magatte Wade
Founder of Adina World Beverages, Tiossan and Skin is Skin

Senegal is one of the poorest nations on earth,with one of the highest rates of unemployment. Although the Senegalese people are hardworking and entrepreneurial, lack of investment in the country deprives them of opportunities to achieve their full potential.
In this inspiring lecture, you’ll meet Magatte Wade, who is using her entrepreneurial skills to help alleviate poverty and create prosperity in her African homeland. Born in Senegal and educated in Germany and France, Wade launched her entrepreneurial career in San Francisco, founded two companies that brought African-inspired beverages and beauty products to U.S. markets and committed 50 percent of her profits to the creation of entrepreneurial schools to educate, mentor and empower future generations of Senegalese entrepreneurs.
 
As this global visionary and change agent shares her remarkable story, you’ll learn about her newest company, Skin is Skin, and its mission to reduce racial discrimination—as well as her ongoing efforts to offer employment and exposure to world-class innovation, technology, design and entrepreneurship to her Senegalese compatriots. “As we and Senegal grow,” says Wade, “Senegalese children will be empowered to exercise their ambitious hearts and some day see the fruits of their labor change the world.”
 
Magatte Wade is passionate about creating jobs and prosperity in Africa through entrepreneurship and economic freedom. Fluent in Wolof, French and English, Wade has spoken about issues related to economic freedom and Africa at Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, the University of California at Berkeley, Wharton, Yale and dozens of other colleges and universities. She has written for Barron’s, The Guardian and The Huffington Post. A TED Global Africa fellow, Wade was named a “Young Global Leader” by the Davos Global Economic Forum and recognized as one of the “20 Youngest Power Women in Africa” by Forbes in 2011.

Tuesday, September 25
9:30 to 9:50 a.m.—Coffee in the Marillac Room
10 to 11:30 a.m.—Lecture and Q&A session in the Loyola Theater
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.—Luncheon in the Marillac Room
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To form women and men for meaningful lives of leadership and service in imitation of Jesus Christ through a college preparatory education in the Jesuit, Catholic tradition.
Loyola Academy admits students of any race, color and national origin or ethnic origin.